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Rescue in Chile

 

October 13, 2010

--In these troubled times we are living, so filled with depressing economical, political and environmental bad news, the successful rescue of the miners in Chile is a breath of fresh air.

Surviving a remarkable record of 69 days, trapped at more than 2000 feet deep underground, these brave men have excelled in breaking any record, surfacing alive from the deepest rescue ever made.  What many see as a miracle, must also consider the beneficial use of the modern technology that has allowed communication as well as providing them with vital oxygen, food and water.

 

Something very important in the quest for peace and human understanding is evident in how Chile has managed this crisis. In  other natural disasters, some countries, rather than accept or ask for outside help, hold on to old hatreds, nationalistic pride, political differences and religious divisions preventing such cooperation to be carried out.

In Chile, the aid has poured in from many nations and in many forms. Regardless of political ideology or religions, technical and advisory assistance arrived in abundance with the positive results we see.

The president of Chile, Sebastián Piñera, summed up this achievement by saying that the operation, "has no parallel in human history"

Hopefully, this positive example of cooperation and understanding will help us reconsider that we are one planet, one world, one people. There are solutions to problems including the awful danger of annihilation by nuclear weapons. These solutions are based primarily on the love of peace, the environment and humanity.

We salute the Chilean brothers, finally reunited with family and friends and also, all those who have contributed to the positive outcome that the world celebrates joyfully.

 

Ruben Arvizu is Senior Advisor for Communications to Latin America of  Jean-Michel Cousteau’s  Ocean Futures Society and Director to Latin America of Nuclear Age Peace Foundation.